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Time’s up for Argentina

Buenos Aires: round 2 + Iguaçu falls: last but not least

sunny 26 °C

If you’ve ever wondered what a 600g piece of steak looks like then look no further: I’ve got a picture right here. This juicy and tender slab was Mike’s main meal at La Cabrera restaurant, Buenos Aires. Yep – it tasted even better than it looks. I went for the slightly more lady-like sized portion of 400g. But this was after sharing the biggest chorizo wheel, squeezing in a few fries (most went untouched) and sampling a few other mini condiment dishes. Neither of us had lunch in preparation for this meat feast and we’re both kinda proud (but also slightly ashamed) to admit we did eat all the meat. Well when its 50% off food and drink why not? We had intended to go out afterwards for a drink or two in town; however we both needed to lie down. Lol.

1 400g and its all mine

1 400g and its all mine

2. This is what 600g of steak looks like

2. This is what 600g of steak looks like

You know you’ve eaten too much at dinner when you wake up still full, so to dispel that glutinous feeling we walked around for most of the next day marvelling at all the street art. La Boca district of Buenos Aires was like nothing we saw in Santiago – entire blocks are covered with murals and we lost count of all the mannequins adorning balconies and store entrances. They’re certainly not afraid to use a bit of colour either.

We couldn’t really come to Buenos Aires without having a few drinks in town! It’s Buenos Aires after all. Our hostel provided the perfect roof top terrace for a few quiet beers beforehand; it being bad form (and completely pointless) to go anywhere before about 1am. So just after 2am a group of us headed out for the night; returning only a few hours later! On any other ‘normal’ night out 4.30am would be considered a good effort (at least by me). Not so in BA. Anything short of 7am is considered pretty pathetic. One of our dorm mates came home just after 5am (he had been out till after 7am the previous night, so not pathetic at all) and scared the living shit out of Mike and I by jumping down from the top bunk ninja style in the small hours. Unfortunately he used our bunk bed at a stopping post but that only resulted in our entire bunk bed sliding along the floor (with both of us in it), stopping only when it came into contact with another bunk bed, cushioned by a nice fat backpack. Mike thought we were experiencing an earthquake, Richter 8 or something. We would find out the next day that he actually fell out of bed, landed on his feet (so a ninja after all) but hurt his wrist. Oh the joys of dorm life. lol

3. Steet art, Buenos Aires style

3. Steet art, Buenos Aires style

4. Street art, La Boca district 1

4. Street art, La Boca district 1

5. Street art, La Boca district 2

5. Street art, La Boca district 2

6. Street art, La Boca district 3

6. Street art, La Boca district 3

Then it was another night bus for us (our 4th in a week) to get to Iguaçu falls. I don’t really need to say much about the falls. Justly deserving their ‘Natural Wonder of the World’ status they are truly spectacular and need to be on everyone’s ‘places to visit’ list. Not to diminish Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe in any way, but they don’t really compare. The sheer size and volume of water involved is hard to comprehend; every minute enough water falls down to fill 36 Olympic sized swimming pools. 36!!!!! EVERY MINUTE!!!!! And it takes a good 6 hours to walk around all the viewing platforms to see them all, so a great way to spend our last day in Argentina. The wildlife was pretty impressive too – although we were hoping to see a Tucan (we didn’t) we did see lots of other (less cool) birds, and a turtle (very cool). I don’t know what the little skunk/rodent animals are called but I don’t like having to defend my sandwiches with my body! Cute but annoying.

7. Walking along the lower circuit, Iguazu Falls

7. Walking along the lower circuit, Iguazu Falls

8. Iguazu Falls

8. Iguazu Falls

9. 10% cte 90% anoying, Iguazu Falls

9. 10% cute 90% annoying, Iguazu Falls

10. Terrence the Turtle at Iguazu Falls

10. Terrence the Turtle at Iguazu Falls

11. Iguazu Falls,

11. Iguazu Falls,

12. Iguazu Falls

12. Iguazu Falls

13. Iguazu Falls

13. Iguazu Falls

14. Double rainbow, Iguazu Falls

14. Double rainbow, Iguazu Falls

15. Iguazu Falls

15. Iguazu Falls

Keely

Posted by Mike.Keely 08:24 Archived in Argentina Comments (1)

Food glorious food. Gout club Mendoza style!

We went for wine, but the food was divine!

sunny 25 °C

We arrived at our Hostel in Mendoza just after 5 o’clock in the morning. Mike headed straight for the nearest couch for a bit more shut eye, but strangely enough I felt pretty good. Maybe getting the (almost) fully reclining bus seat gave me the physiological edge to think I was well rested after all? Either way I was all over the free breakfast (3 cups of coffee, 2 pastries) and all over the free internet organising our lives.

Two full days in Mendoza was all our itinerary would allow and we had two main objectives: one really good meal at a winery, and a bike/wine tour.

We had been given two recommendations for where to go for lunch by a few friends who have been to the area recently; the websites certainly looking like just the sort of places we had in mind. The guy at our hostel called one “monstrous” and the other just “okay”. And who was he to say these things? Well he co-wrote the restaurant section for Mendoza in the ‘Rough Guide’ travel book, so he may know a thing or two. I can’t really say enough about hostels with great staff – all that local knowledge – makes all the difference really when travelling around. The hostel guy (who was actually called Mike, but I’ll call him ‘the hostel guy’ to avoid confusion) thoroughly convinced us to give another winery a crack. Vistalba was our destination; apparently one of the best restaurants in Argentina – a very bold statement indeed. Off we trotted – one 45 minute bus ride followed by a 20 minute walk later we were at this place. The security guide wouldn’t let us in (maybe he disliked our jandel/Birkenstock attire?). But he made a phone call to someone, handed the phone to Mike who just said his name before being told “yes, you may come in now”. It being a Tuesday at the very tail end of the high season the place was pretty deserted. We made only one of 3-4 other tables in a fairly large restaurant. Still we weren’t there to judge its appearance, or its atmosphere - only the food (and wine). I tried kid goat for the first time but Mike chose the winning meal with veal and gnocchi – OMG it was delicious! The best veal he has ever had. The hostel guy was certainly pleased when Mike told him all about it. We may have overstayed our welcome just a tad; arriving just after 1pm and not leaving until after 4.30pm. Opps! Good times!

1. Starter. Octopus, prosciutto, crushed potato and peppers

1. Starter. Octopus, prosciutto, crushed potato and peppers

2. Main. Veal with gnocchi, malbeck and vinegar dressing with aubergine

2. Main. Veal with gnocchi, malbeck and vinegar dressing with aubergine

3. Main. Kid goat and mushroom pie with potato cake

3. Main. Kid goat and mushroom pie with potato cake

4. Dessert. Duche de leche 'volcano cake' with caramel and banana

4. Dessert. Duche de leche 'volcano cake' with caramel and banana

5. First civilised meal for a while. LOL

5. First civilised meal for a while. LOL

6. In raw form......

6. In raw form......



The next day it was time to get on a bike and see some of the surrounding countryside, visit a few wineries and sample some more local wine. Again the company I had ear-marked for this purpose was replaced by one the hostel recommended, and again we weren’t disappointed in the slightest with their choice. Joining us for the day was Jason – an American who when asked what country he was from would just say New York. Hilarious! Jason was doing a quick 6 week trip southwards so was able to give us lots of pointers for Rio and the east coast Brazilian beaches which was sweet, and in return we told him everything we knew about Santiago. Great deal!

We picked up our bikes along with a map of the area and a rough itinerary of where to go, which wineries to visit and in what order. Some had specific times for the guided tours, others we could pop in whenever. Excellent! The last time I rode a bike was in Vienna – doing exactly the same thing – along the Wacchu valley. My butt would hurt just as much afterwards as it did after that day if I recall correctly. The bikes were of a much better quality in Vienna as well, as we were soon to find out……

Neither of our bikes had changeable gears, and at times would make some strange noises but luckily we didn’t have far to go in-between wineries. I say wineries and not vineyards because several of the places we visited grow or buy their grapes from different places. One winery we visited had their own vineyards in 6 different locations around Argentina. All to do with different soil properties, weather, types of grapes grown, harvest yields, etc. etc. We leant lots of very interesting things about wine in Argentina but I still don’t even pretend to know the first thing about wine. Leave that to the experts – I know what I like and that’s good enough for me. Word of the day definitely was “complexity”. Lost count of the times we heard the likes of: “this wine has a very complex flavour”, “the complexity of the aroma”, “it’s a complex mix of different grape varieties”. If we didn’t know any better I would say all wineries are part of a challenge to see who can say that word the most times.

All joking aside it was an excellent day. The sun was shining (despite rain forecasted), lunch was superb (more juicy meat) and the tastings delicious (and very reasonably priced). Even Mike getting a flat tire was no trouble at all – a replacement bike appearing at the next winery (but again with no working gears).

All too soon it was time to head back into Mendoza town for another overnight bus. As we had upgraded to the ‘cama’ seats on the last bus, we bought the absolute cheapest tickets for this bus. Maybe we got a free upgrade, maybe the ticket person made a mistake. Whatever the reason we were in the first class section and the seats fully reclined. Yep – totally flat. Mike slept on his stomach. I think I got 8 hours. Result. Have we mentioned we love Argentina!

7. Lunch cooking on the grill

7. Lunch cooking on the grill

8. Finished product

8. Finished product

9. So many samples to try....

9. So many samples to try....

Argentina means steak – so back to Buenos Aires for us so we can have lots more steak before heading to Iguaçu Falls. I wonder if they will be as spectacular as Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe – I’ll find out in a few days!

Keely

Posted by Mike.Keely 04:40 Archived in Argentina Comments (1)

This is Santiago

14 hours is plenty of time

sunny 29 °C

Pucon can keep its rain – we were headed for sunnier pastures north. After a 10 hour overnight bus trip where I got precisely 0 sleep we were in Santiago. What am I – the world’s premier magnet for snorers? Anyway we had 14 hours in Santiago and a few things planned so after dumping our bags with the nice man at the ‘custodia’ office we walked into town to see what could be seen.

I wasn’t prepared to do anything without first having a coffee. I probably wasn’t even able to do much more than find a coffee store. After that necessity accomplished it was time to find our “free walking tour”. Note that nothing is ever really free and the people taking these tours reply on tips – the recommended tip being pretty reasonable though. At the appointed place at the appointed time we met Antonio who would turn out to be our own private tour guide as no-one else showed up. Result! Thus for the next 4 hours we followed him around listening to political, historical, architectural and personal facts about Santiago, Chile and himself. All very interesting! The street art caught my eye – countless walls, fences and doors have been given a colourful makeover.

Antonio confirmed something we had already worked out for ourselves in the short time we had been in Santiago – “coffee shops” come in all shapes and sizes, but the “girls” working in them aren’t there to make coffee if you know what I mean. Be very careful which cafes you enter!

The only other noteworthy event of the early morning was an extremely close call between Mike and another stray but otherwise nice looking dog. Careful not to spill his coffee (bought from a proper café, not the men’s club variety of course) the dog eyed up his ankle but Mike shouting “bite me and I’ll wop yo ass” sent him running. The absolutely side-splittingly hilarious part (for me) was watching the face of an elderly man as he walked past at that precise moment. He understood 100% what Mike said and found it almost as funny as I did. Glad to be able to provide some entertainment for the locals on their way to work on a Monday morning.

After our tour it was time for the best empanadas Santiago has to offer, at the oldest establishment (cerca 1930). Pretty good too (maybe even better than those we had in Bariloche but it’s a tough call). This little feast was followed by a small lie down in the park because by this time we had been walking around non-stop for 5 ½ hours and the sun was killing us.

Feeling somewhat restored our next objective was to climb San Cristobel. Only 45 minutes of straight up climbing so not up to our usual mountaineering standards but in 29 degrees C the sunscreen was literally dripping off by the time we reached the top. The view from the top was pretty spectacular (not up to Cerro Campanario standards though). A few pictures at the top was followed by unknowingly following the LONG path down, taking about 2 hours to get back to the ice-cream store that had taken our fancy beforehand.

A slow stroll back to the bus station and that was the end of our 14 hours in Santiago. 10 hours of walking and we had managed to do everything we wanted to, with a few extras. Getting on the bus for another overnight journey was made close to perfection by the fact we had paid an extra £2 for a “cama bed” – almost fully reclining. Not bad for bus travel, and that bad boy chair was very comfortable. Having to get out at 1.30am to do all the necessary immigration/passport stamping and bag searching was a real kick in the teeth though.

Next stop: wine, wine, and more wine in Mendoza with a bit of bike riding and a bit of really excellent food.

Ciao, Keely

Santiago street art 1

Santiago street art 1

This is Santiago

This is Santiago

Santiago street art 2

Santiago street art 2

Santiago, Palace

Santiago, Palace

Yum - Carne empanada from the oldest empanada house in Santiago c. 1930

Yum - Carne empanada from the oldest empanada house in Santiago c. 1930

Santiago street art 3

Santiago street art 3

Posted by Mike.Keely 16:57 Archived in Chile Comments (4)

Pucon – from bad to worse to terrible

Our luck’s run dry :-(

rain 10 °C

Pucon was never on our itinerary. I definitely had never heard of Villirica Volcano before a few weeks ago. Ever since we began hearing descriptions from other travellers about the challenging 5 hour uphill accent and short but hilarious descent sliding down on mats I was hooked. Convincing Mike took slightly longer than I thought it would but in the end we were both as excited as each other: climbing an active volcano. Awesome! And climbing with ice picks and crampons would add a new dimension to our walking. Despite the fact that several people who we had spoken to hadn’t actually seen molten lava bubbling away when they peered over the edge –we were certain we would. We were equally certain that we wouldn’t get the chairlift at the beginning; walking the entire way.

Our primary concern was the weather. Mother Nature had been a bit grumpy lately but we didn’t let her get the upper hand in Bariloche and we had all fingers and toes crossed for a similar outcome for Pucon. We would have 3 chances to get up the Mountain: Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The 5 day forecast had Friday and Sunday looking decidedly average, so all hopes were pinned on Saturday – sunshine predicted. Happy days – worth the time and expense of the detour there we thought.

After a 13 hour bus trip from Bariloche we arrived in Pucon to rain. No surprise there – it had rained non-stop for the entire 13 hour trip. This was all right though as we knew the days before and after our attempted ascent would be wet. Our hostel had been recommended to us by an Irish girl we had met and when we arrived found it was run by a Kiwi. Awesome! The hostel has its own tourist outfit providing its own excursions, equipment and guides etc. Dave (the Kiwi) has been in Chile for 3 years and knows his stuff.

This is where the story goes from worse to terrible. Unbeknown to us, while we were on the bus watching the rain pelt against the windows four tourists were in trouble up on the mountain. By the time we had arrived at the hostel one had been pronounced dead, two injured but safe, and the other one still missing. No one really knows what happened because climbing the volcano just isn’t that dangerous. One thing for sure is that the weather wasn’t good enough for anybody to be on the mountain in the first place. Visibility was apparently less than 3 meters so unfortunately and very obviously safety measures had been ignored. And not just from one dodgy company but two. It would take another 2 days before the missing man was found, unfortunately not alive. The frustrating thing for us is that on Saturday we did get the good weather we needed. We walked around town in stunning sunshine in a daze hoping they would find the man and thus re-open the mountain. We maintained only a slim chance that the good weather would hold though.

With our hands tied we decided we should probably make some other plans. We had thought about doing some more walking in the National Park nearby and although this would have been lovely – we think we have done just about enough walking recently so wanted to try out something a bit different. So on Saturday night we ventured out to the “termas los pozones” or hot springs and soaked in the steaming hot natural rock pools for a few hours. On the drive out there we were sitting up front with the driver; him not being able to speak much English and us not much Spanish. He insisted on talking the whole time but we did learn quite a few things: that there are 30 different “termas” in the area, that he has 3 children and 1 grand-daughter and he originates from Santiago. His name is Rodrigo – a great Spanish name.

The next day we were booked to go Canyoning – a mixture of abseiling down waterfalls, rock jumping and swimming down rapids. It sounded like fun and if it was going to rain all day may as well embrace it and get in there. Heavy rain overnight ruined our fun though – the canyoning being cancelled due to dangerously high water levels. Shit balls! But at least safety was put first – a fact that Dave insists is first and foremost for all his tour dealings. The two tour companies involved will no doubt lose their licences but this is small consolation for the tragedy that unfolded.

So instead of going canyoning what did we do? Watch football with Spanish commentary; Mike at least was mildly consoled. And me? I wrote this blog and helped two British girls plan their tour of New Zealand.

Pucon is a lovely little town. The mountains and lake that surrounded it are indeed picturesque, and of course the Volcano that towers over the town is ever dominant. For us though Pucon has been moved to the “list of places that need re-visiting” – the lure of that bloody volcano isn’t going to diminish any time soon I fear. On this trip we simply don’t have the time to hang about so Santiago here we come. The forecast there is a rather warm 29 degrees C.

Keely

Posted by Mike.Keely 08:50 Archived in Chile Comments (1)

If National Geographic says it's good, it's good

Two days in Bariloche ended up being 5 days. How did that happen?

rain 10 °C

There were two things in Bariloche that caught our attention and would need exploring:
1. Cerro Catedral (yes, yet another mountain to climb with its accompanying glacier and lagoon panoramic). Can’t get enough really!
2. Cerro Campanario viewpoint (National Geographic claims it to be one of the top 10 on the planet). Can’t let that go unchecked!
We reckoned two days would be sufficient to do both these things, but also leave ample time for chocolate shopping (and of course chocolate consumption). Bariloche apparently mirrors the Swiss Alps so convincingly Swiss people feel right at home here. The chocolate in both places is apparently excellent but having never been to the Swiss Alps can only comment on the Bariloche chocolate. It is indeed excellent. For the purposes of ‘research’ I had to sample quite a few to be able to say that with absolute conviction of course.

1. These are all for me, where are yours

1. These are all for me, where are yours

Unfortunately ‘Mother Nature’ didn’t get the memo and denied us the good weather we needed for our two day trips. Our first day was spent in the hostel doing a few jobs and organising ourselves – it being way too wet outside for even the quickest trip into town for chocolate. Our second day dawned ever so slightly brighter (i.e. no rain but tons of cloud) so we decided to give the view point a try. By the time the bus dropped us off the cloud was even worse; and the rain settling in; the view point would have to wait.

Up until Bariloche we had been so incredibly lucky with the weather: chalking up 7 full days of walking in near perfect conditions all over Patagonia. A bit of cloud we can handle but with mist and rain added, no deal. We ended up walking around the Campanario Circuit in search for the ‘hidden lake’ and checking out some of the “short hikings” our bus driver had told us about in the area. The hidden lake is aptly named – we walked straight past it, took some photos of it, then sent some other tourists in the opposite direction without realising we had already been there. Haven’t they ever heard of a sign! The views around the area were lovely – I’m guessing quite spectacular without the layer of mist in the way. All in all we walked about 17km, snacking frequently on some excellent dark chocolate before returning to town for coffee and cupcakes. Really good ones too!

2. View obscured slightly on the Circuit Path by cloud and mist

2. View obscured slightly on the Circuit Path by cloud and mist

There was no other option but to extend our stay! We booked another night, then another night and then yet another night. But we did get to do our walks eventually. Our third day in Bariloche dawned bright and sunny so no matter what we were going to tackle Cerro Catedral. Mike royally jinxed us by saying “can’t believe I brought my fleece” early on in the day. The morning was sunny, at one point we were both down to shorts and t-shirts. By mid-afternoon we were wearing every layer and glad for them too. Getting up to the refugio was easy enough; through forest and on a proper track. Getting up to the lagoon and over the mountain was infinitely more difficult. First up we had to contend with gale force winds - being quite light I actually thought I would get blown off the mountain. And secondly we had to contend with rock climbing. Equipment wasn’t necessary but both hands and feet (and in my case a helping hand from Mike a few times also) were definitely necessary. The “path” if one can call it that was marked by red dots. Every 10-30 meters a rock i painted with a red circle to point the way. Without these markers the walk would be literally impossible. It was almost like a ‘where’s Wally’ exercise; find the red dot, get to the red dot, find the next red dot, get to the red dot. I actually really enjoy this type of walk where the terrain changes often, but after 3 hours of this ‘rock climbing’ we were both over it. The scenery on the other side of the mountains was worth the climb though; green valleys, waterfalls, winding streams, lakes and small islands off in the distance. But also an ominous layer or cloud. The decent was easy enough – following dry ski trails underneath deserted chair lifts. Unfortunately ski trails don’t offer the most direct route down a mountain, so following these as they twisted and turned down the mountain literally took FOREVER, well 2 ½ hours is forever when it’s raining. Mike got a bit nostalgic for his former snowboarding days, imagining what it would be like in winter with a dusting of fresh powder and a board strapped to his feet. But when it’s pouring with rain and you’ve already been walking for 5 hours the last thing you need is the long way down. We were rewarded at the bottom by the chocolate shop still being open so treated ourselves with a milk chocolate log similar to a flake only heaps better.

3. Cerro Catedral, 1 day walk to lagoon etc

3. Cerro Catedral, 1 day walk to lagoon etc

4. The path is off to the right somewhere.....

4. The path is off to the right somewhere.....

5. Cerro Catedral, 1 day walk.  Lots of rain but a pretty rainbow on the way down

5. Cerro Catedral, 1 day walk. Lots of rain but a pretty rainbow on the way down

The day after that we didn’t achieve much. Party due to being dog tired and party due to more miserable weather; we were more than happy for a day doing nothing. By that stage we had done 9 full days of walking in 19 days, 5 bus trips and crossed from Argentina to Chile and back to Argentina again. A day of nothing (well washing, supermarket, chocolate, bus ticket buying etc) didn’t at all feel like a wasted day.

A significant decision was made on our day of nothing: to go to Pucon or not? We had been humming and haring for the best past of 3 days trying to decide whether to detour there on our way to Mendoza. We really needed to buy bus tickets to our next destination, which is pretty difficult when you don’t know where the next destination is. What sealed the deal was being able to get there in one day instead of overnighting somewhere random along the way. Bus tickets bought – Pucon here we come.

6. Typical Bariloche scene

6. Typical Bariloche scene

7. St Bernard, earning his keep by posing for 'official' photos with tourists

7. St Bernard, earning his keep by posing for 'official' photos with tourists

Before that we had one more day in Bariloche. The forecast was ever promising (the sun dance must have worked then). All hopes for the viewpoint pinned on that one day but Mother Nature was on our side, finally. Yay – sunshine! Now I’ve spent a fair while on the National Geographic website searching for this list of top 10 best views on the planet. There are all sorts of top 10 lists: my favourites being “top 10 places to see holiday lights” or “top 10 places to eat ice cream”. Either Argentina needs to change its advertising, or I need to spend some more time on the National geographic website because not only is Cerro Campanario not on there, but “top 10 best views” isn’t even a category.

Having spent 45 minutes hiking up there, in near perfect weather (well can’t complain too loudly with a few clouds after days of rain) we can say without doubt and with utter conviction that the National geographic NEEDS a best view category because Cerro Campanario ought to be on it. I’ve said before that we need to master the panoramic setting on our camera so until we have figured out how to piece it all together on the computer you will have to be content with a small section of the view. Simply breath-taking; the best we’ve seen so far and 100% worth waiting for.

8. Worth waiting for

8. Worth waiting for

9. Top 10 view, Cerro Campanario

9. Top 10 view, Cerro Campanario

I’m sure everyone will be aware that the empanadas in South America are legendary but we were yet to sample any despite having spent 3 weeks here. On our way back from the bus station we saw a sign and ducked into the store. I always like it when locals choose the same places as us – means there’s a high chance the food will be good and sure enough a little old lady was sitting in the corner with a plate of 3 empanadas. Excellent stuff. I had a chicken one, Mike a meat one and they were pretty good. We both could have eaten about 10 through and at 4 pesos each (£0.55) could afford to as well. The hostel we were at had an “empanada night” whereby one of the guys working there buys all the ingredients and makes up the filling. The guests help to roll up the individual pastry parcels. We were all over that. The guy at the hostel was claiming that his empanadas were the best in all of Southern Argentina (only the South because he has never been to the Northern part so can’t boast all of Argentina). With 15 people signed up, and 124 pastry sheets to fill everyone got quite a bit of practice making the perfect empanada. We were thankfully aiming for open topped triangles not the classic closed and frilled edge variety. Trays and trays lined up for the oven and 40 minutes after the first batch went in dinner was served. Now these were delicious. I had 7, Mike had 6 (shocking I know, to out eat Mike). Straight from the oven though – as good as it gets. And for 15 pesos each (£2.10) a very cheap dinner.

10. These are also all for me

10. These are also all for me

Next up: Climbing an active volcano in Pucon – how totally awesome is that? All fingers and toes crossed for some good weather (not looking so good at the moment however). First though another 12 hour bus trip crossing back into Chile where the highlight was seeing the Golden Labrador sniffer dog give all the bags a once over at the border. He found a few ‘illegal’ apples (definitely not in our bags) and got a treat for being such a good sniffer dog.

Keely

Posted by Mike.Keely 09:07 Archived in Argentina Comments (1)

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